‘Cannabis burned throughout worship’ by ancient Israelites

File photo of ruins of the temple in Arad

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Marijuana residue was found on an altar at the temple in Arad.

An unspoiled substance found in a 2,700- year-old temple in Tel Arad has actually been identified as marijuana, including its psychedelic substance THC.

Researchers concluded that marijuana might have been burned in order to induce a high among worshippers.

The temple was first discovered in the Negev desert, about 95 km (59 miles) south of Tel Aviv, in the 1960 s.

In the newest study, released in Tel Aviv University’s archaeological journal, archaeologists state two limestone altars had been buried within the shrine.

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It’s thought cannabis was burned to cause a psychoactive effect in worshippers.

Nevertheless, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) – all substances found in marijuana – were discovered on the 2nd altar.

The research study includes that the findings in Tel Arad recommend that marijuana likewise played a function in praise at the Temple of Jerusalem.

The remains of the temple in Jerusalem are now inaccessible to archaeologists, so rather they study Arad and other comparable shrines to help them comprehend worship at the bigger temple.

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